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              Earliest Known Review                     
of Allan Hart's Paintings
                        Los Angeles Times, June 5, 1970
               "A Critical Guide to the Galleries"
                    by Henry J. Seldis and William Wilson
                                                                                                     
                                  
 La Cienega

Allan Hart's pictures look as if they were painted by Macbeth's
weird sisters, murky middleground landscapes full of ominous
events.  In one a man stands next to a polar bear whose double
floats in the sky, Creepy twins, scarier versions of Laugh-In's dirty  
old man walk apart in a landscape that erupts into flame.  A pre-
view look suggested a maturing talent and a remarkable change of
pace in the usual far-out-far-in look of the Wilder Gallery.The exhi-
bition also contains Pop-like portraits of early Americans, small
paintings and a bedside table painted with clouds. All that
suggests a young artist gestating rapidly, producing work in varied
directions to find out more precisely who he is.

I certainly hope Allan Hart turns out as consistently magical as he
appears in that painting were a dismembered torso floats in deli-
cate tatters above the landscape.(Nicholas Wilder Gallery, 814 N.
La Cienega; through June 30.)    William Wilson


   A Critque of William Wilson's Review
                                 by Allan Hart        
t                                                                                    

First of all, William Wilson probably never painted a painting in  his
entire life.  Secondly, my dark paintings (not "pictures") are from
my subconcious and have absolutely nothing to do with Shake-
speare's "Macbeth's weird sisters". sisters". As for Wilson's "Creepy
twins, scarier versions of Laugh-In's dirty old man", the man is an
idiot, has been watching too much television and shouldn't be
writing reviews on art.  The painting (not "picture") Wilson is refer-
ing to is "The Artist and His Sculpture"(
#25) painted in 1969 at the
height of the Vietnam War, which was partly painted out of my
subconcious and has to do with the Vietnam War (therefore the
explosions in the landscape); the fact that both my twin brother,
Brian, and I resisted the Vietnam War with a passion, and us being
twins ("The Artist and His Sculpture" are the two mirror image
figures walking away from each other in the landscape). At the
time, Brian and I had moved apart from each other and lived in
different studios in different locations.  In 1969, Brian and I were in
our early twenties and we were certainly not "creepy" as Wilson
states.  We actually appeared more angelic in real life and in the
painting we appear more pensive and brooding than "creepy twins,
scarier versions of Laugh-In's dirty old man" as Wilson states.
Wilson's description is absolutely ridiculous.I actually do not
"appear in that painting where a dismembered torso floats in
delicate tatters above the landscape".  This painting, which I titled
"Fresh Air" (
#22), is actually about the Vietnam War, where
"dismembered torsos" were everywhere. Wilson was correct in two
of his perceptions when he stated:"A preview look suggested a
maturing talent and a remarkable change of pace in the usual
far-out-far-in look of the Wilder Gallery." and "All that suggests a
young artist gestating rapidly, producing work in varied directions to
find out more precisely who he is."  So much for art reviews.  I cer-
tainly did not allow it to effect me, one way or the other, nor did
Iallow it to charter my course. After nearly forty (40) years, I may
have lost my compass, but, I am still afloat, possibly with one oar.  
My brother says that the early Slavs spent thousands of years
loating around in small cicular  goat-skin boats with one oar. I sup-
pose that I have "come full circle".
©Copyright  2006 and 2011 by Brian Carl Hart  / All Rights Reserved